Operation Mania

Help Doctor Humorus manage the mayhem of a wacky emergency room in this hilarious Time Management game! You’re in charge of everything; admit the patients, diagnose their funatomical illnesses and save them with slap-stick surgery mini-games! The clock`s against you as you work to make Humorus M.D. the most sought-after doctor in the world. Take care of your patients before they lose patience in Operation Mania!

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Operation Mania Level 1 Walkthrough Gameplay Playthrough

Operation Mania is the kind of game where your enemy is time, as you're required to quickly move patients from waiting room, check-in desk, beds, X-ray machines and operating tables to get them out the door and earn you money. And then, under all that, are mini-games you can perform at the operating table for bonus dollars. Run yourself ragged at a frenzied pace while treating patients, performing operations, x-rays, etc. Some rare don't need surgery at all. Final word: try it first and if you can endure the frustration, enjoy. In all, there's quite a bit you need to pay attention to in the game, something the stage-based story mode does a good job of introducing you to and something the marathon mode throws at you all at once. Sadly, yes. I thought this would be more of an arcade type game but instead it is more like a time management game. Verdict It's hard to say whether Operation Mania is a critique of the American health system, whether it's how doctors view patients as dollar amount or how hospitals are woefully understaffed, or whether it's just a frantic twitch title loosely based on the like-named board game. In the board game you use tweezers to carefully remove bits from the board without touching strategically placed metallic strips. While the game may bear a passing resemblance to the Milton Bradley board game, it's not really the same. Game is not bad - it would be entertaining to play for a while but I just wasn't fascinated enough with it to keep playing. And there is not a drop of blood or severed limb to be seen, although occasionally, a patient will go to the great beyond with a flatline and a harp, so I'd say that kids would be able to enjoy this game too. A twitchy casual game where patients equal dollars. In This Article.

The game throws quite a few variations into this formula to add variety to the play. If you take too long to fill a patient's needs, they die. Patients come in and you must match them at the registration desk by the color of their shirts in order to achieve chaining bonuses. If you don't get to them in time, they die. They all have icons over their heads indicating what kind of treatment they need, and using the mouse you pick them up and plop them down at the appropriate station, be it the check-in desk, operating table or X-ray setup. You don't really have to do these, though, and once enough patients crowd your office you won't really want to do it as it throws off your rhythm and planning, as you can queue your doctor's movements to move from one station to give you a second to scan a few steps ahead. In This Article. Timer runs out and the patient codes. First off, every patient has a timer. Yes indeedy. You play a doctor in an emergency room. Final word: try it first and if you can endure the frustration, enjoy. And don't get me started on the writer's cramp. Game is not bad - it would be entertaining to play for a while but I just wasn't fascinated enough with it to keep playing. Maybe these flaws can be gotten past by more forgiving folks than I but they put a serious scar on the game for me.


France Operation Mania

The entire game takes place on a static screen and puts you in control of a wiry-haired doctor. Play elective mini-games during surgeries for extra points - they're humorous and fun too. Most do. So you need to constantly be scanning the screen for who needs attention first, then make sure you have enough open stations to take care of them, as there are a limited number of check in desks, operating tables, beds, and wheelchairs to Frankenstein: The Dismembered Bride out any patients you can't quite get to. Alerts like health inspections and epidemics will occasionally sound to mix things up even further. You don't really have to do these, though, and once enough patients crowd your office you won't really want to do it as it throws off Operation Mania rhythm and planning, as you can queue your doctor's movements to move from one station to give you a second to scan a few steps ahead. And don't get me started on the writer's cramp. In this video game, some of the patients that enter the hospital look similar to the one from the board game, but the mechanics are different, and, as it turns out, pretty entertaining. But don't worry, if enough pass into the afterlife on your watch you get a trophy. If you take too long to fill a patient's needs, they die. It's nowhere close to as addictive as other casual titles like Peggle or Puzzle Quest: Challenge of the Warlords, but Operation Mania a decent choice if you're looking for something affordable, a little more action-oriented and don't have a high-powered rig to run something like Crysis Warhead. So what, you say? So overall there are quite a few layers to the gameplay, which turn out to make this a deeper experience than you might expect for a casual style game. Patients come in and you must match them at the Virtual Families desk by the color of their shirts in order Operation Mania achieve chaining bonuses.

Some rare don't need surgery at all. So overall there are quite a few layers to the gameplay, which turn out to make this a deeper experience than you might expect for a casual style game. I thought this would be more of an arcade type game but instead it is more like a time management game. Being faced with a solid wall of ouch is not a good time. Things start off with patients lining up on waiting room seats, the number of which increases as you move through either story or marathon mode. You also get chaining bonuses for treating the same color shirts on the matching operating table or for doing the same actions in a row 2 x registration desk, for example. Patients come in and you must match them at the registration desk by the color of their shirts in order to achieve chaining bonuses. When it comes time for surgery, you can let the doctor do it, or you can try for bonus points by doing it yourself. If you do it yourself, you are solving the ailments from the board game Operation - each is a mini game centered on the ailment in question. Slightly broken? If you don't get to them in time, they die. It is more profitable to do the mini games but they get kinda old fast.

If you played the original board game, or even if you didn't, you'll enjoy this! So you need to constantly be scanning the screen for who needs attention first, then make sure you have enough open stations to take care of them, as there are a limited number of check in desks, Hexic Deluxe tables, beds, and wheelchairs to rush out any patients you can't quite get to. Alerts like health inspections and epidemics will occasionally sound to mix things up even further. You Argonauts Agency: Chair of Hephaestus can buy upgrades Battle Slots most are extremely expensive so you cannot afford them for a while. I thought this would be more of an arcade Isidiada game but instead it is more like a time management game. In all, there's quite a bit you need to pay attention to in the game, something the stage-based story mode does a good job of introducing you to and something the marathon Operation Mania throws at you all at once. Sadly, yes. The mini-games are all pretty simplistic and throwaway activities, Operation Mania extremely rudimentary twitch skills to perform goofy actions like catching frogs in burlap sacks, whacking tennis balls, and a few memory challenges. You don't really have to do these, though, and once enough patients crowd your office you won't really want to do it as it throws off your rhythm and planning, as you can queue your doctor's movements to move from one station to give you Operation Mania second to scan a few steps ahead. Maybe these flaws can be gotten past by more forgiving folks than I but they put a serious scar on the game for me. Things start off with patients lining up on waiting room seats, the number of which increases as you move through either story or marathon mode. So what, you say? And then, under all that, are mini-games you can perform at the operating table for bonus dollars.


I'd give it 3. But don't worry, if enough pass into the afterlife on your watch you get a trophy. The mini-games are all pretty simplistic and throwaway activities, requiring extremely rudimentary twitch skills to perform goofy actions like catching frogs in burlap sacks, whacking tennis balls, and a few memory challenges. So you need to constantly be scanning the screen for who needs attention first, then make sure you have enough open stations to take care of them, as there are a limited number of check in desks, operating tables, beds, and wheelchairs to rush out any patients you can't quite get to. The entire game takes place on a static screen and puts you in control of a wiry-haired doctor. And then, under all that, are mini-games you can perform at the operating table for bonus dollars. Patients come in and you must match them at the registration desk by the color of their shirts in order to achieve chaining bonuses. So what, you say? In all, there's quite a bit you need to pay attention to in the game, something the stage-based story mode does a good job of introducing you to and something the marathon mode throws at you all at once. Some rare don't need surgery at all. Each patient's path through the hospital may be different; some may just require a check-in, some may come in with an emergency and need to go to the operating table, but all will turn into a pile of cash once they're done. Game is not bad - it would be entertaining to play for a while but I just wasn't fascinated enough with it to keep playing. Most of these games require a very deft touch to earn a perfect score and many was the time that I cursed at my screen because I my shop-vac or hanky try the game, you'll laugh too was exactly where it should be, but still hurt the patient. It is more profitable to do the mini games but they get kinda old fast.

14 thoughts on “Operation Mania

  1. In This Article. When it comes time for surgery, you can let the doctor do it, or you can try for bonus points by doing it yourself. Play elective mini-games during surgeries for extra points - they're humorous and fun too. If you played the original board game, or even if you didn't, you'll enjoy this!

  2. If you take too long to fill a patient's needs, they die. However, there are some serious flaws that require fixing before I can encourage buying this game. And don't get me started on the writer's cramp. The mini-games are all pretty simplistic and throwaway activities, requiring extremely rudimentary twitch skills to perform goofy actions like catching frogs in burlap sacks, whacking tennis balls, and a few memory challenges.

  3. Yes indeedy. The catch is each patient also has a timer above their head which gradually counts down. A twitchy casual game where patients equal dollars.

  4. Sadly, yes. Game is not bad - it would be entertaining to play for a while but I just wasn't fascinated enough with it to keep playing. And there is not a drop of blood or severed limb to be seen, although occasionally, a patient will go to the great beyond with a flatline and a harp, so I'd say that kids would be able to enjoy this game too.

  5. Final word: try it first and if you can endure the frustration, enjoy. If you played the original board game, or even if you didn't, you'll enjoy this! You also get chaining bonuses for treating the same color shirts on the matching operating table or for doing the same actions in a row 2 x registration desk, for example.

  6. If you played the original board game, or even if you didn't, you'll enjoy this! Very enjoyable and entertaining! Some rare don't need surgery at all. Run yourself ragged at a frenzied pace while treating patients, performing operations, x-rays, etc.

  7. If you do it yourself, you are solving the ailments from the board game Operation - each is a mini game centered on the ailment in question. So you need to constantly be scanning the screen for who needs attention first, then make sure you have enough open stations to take care of them, as there are a limited number of check in desks, operating tables, beds, and wheelchairs to rush out any patients you can't quite get to. Patients come in and you must match them at the registration desk by the color of their shirts in order to achieve chaining bonuses.

  8. But don't worry, if enough pass into the afterlife on your watch you get a trophy. You don't really have to do these, though, and once enough patients crowd your office you won't really want to do it as it throws off your rhythm and planning, as you can queue your doctor's movements to move from one station to give you a second to scan a few steps ahead. And there is not a drop of blood or severed limb to be seen, although occasionally, a patient will go to the great beyond with a flatline and a harp, so I'd say that kids would be able to enjoy this game too.

  9. And while I like tension as much as the next time management fan, it's annoying to hear someone code while I'm working on yet another emergency surgery. And then, under all that, are mini-games you can perform at the operating table for bonus dollars. They all have icons over their heads indicating what kind of treatment they need, and using the mouse you pick them up and plop them down at the appropriate station, be it the check-in desk, operating table or X-ray setup.

  10. If you take too long to fill a patient's needs, they die. If you do, the patient's nose lights up and everybody is supposed to laugh. You don't really have to do these, though, and once enough patients crowd your office you won't really want to do it as it throws off your rhythm and planning, as you can queue your doctor's movements to move from one station to give you a second to scan a few steps ahead. Alerts like health inspections and epidemics will occasionally sound to mix things up even further.

  11. Between the timers and ever-changing demands of the patients, the money earned and upgrades available for purchase, Operation Mania turns out to be a deeper, more entertaining game than you might expect for 20 bucks. And don't get me started on the writer's cramp. Game is not bad - it would be entertaining to play for a while but I just wasn't fascinated enough with it to keep playing. Alerts like health inspections and epidemics will occasionally sound to mix things up even further.

  12. Maybe these flaws can be gotten past by more forgiving folks than I but they put a serious scar on the game for me. When it comes time for surgery, you can let the doctor do it, or you can try for bonus points by doing it yourself. Alerts like health inspections and epidemics will occasionally sound to mix things up even further. Verdict It's hard to say whether Operation Mania is a critique of the American health system, whether it's how doctors view patients as dollar amount or how hospitals are woefully understaffed, or whether it's just a frantic twitch title loosely based on the like-named board game.

  13. Just like in real life, right? Between the timers and ever-changing demands of the patients, the money earned and upgrades available for purchase, Operation Mania turns out to be a deeper, more entertaining game than you might expect for 20 bucks. The game throws quite a few variations into this formula to add variety to the play. Patients come in and you must match them at the registration desk by the color of their shirts in order to achieve chaining bonuses. The catch is each patient also has a timer above their head which gradually counts down.

  14. Most do. And then, under all that, are mini-games you can perform at the operating table for bonus dollars. It is more profitable to do the mini games but they get kinda old fast.

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